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Captain Raymond Juzio Paul Rodakowski was an English officer of the British Army who died during the First World War.

He was born on 15 May 1895,[1] in Woodstock, the son of Ernst Otto Max de Rodakowski, formerly of the 1st Austrian Lancers, and Dora Susan Carnegie, daughter of Sir James Carnegie, 9th Earl of Southesk.[2] His paternal grandfather, Josef von Rodakowski, had been a general in the Austro-Hungarian Army.

Rodakowski studied at Charterhouse and earned a scholarship to Brasenose College, Oxford.[1] At Charterhouse, Rodakowski was a friend of the war poet Robert Graves, but they had an acrimonious falling out when Rodakowski affirmed his atheism to the deeply religious Graves.[3]

After the outbreak of war, Rodakowski volunteered, and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Irish Guards on 7 December 1914.[4] He arrived in France with a draft of reinforcements on 29 May 1915, and joined the 1st Battalion's No. 4 Company. Rodakowski's time on the Western Front saw him wounded at least twice. On 9 October 1917, Rodakowski died while participating in a renewed attack during the Third Ypres offensive, known as the Battle of Poelcappelle. In what was described as a 'successful minor operation', the Irish Guards suffered more than 200 casualties, including at least 50 killed.[5] Rodakowski had been mentioned in despatches in May 1917.[6]

He has no known grave and is commemorated by the Tyne Cot Memorial. His cousin, the Welsh poet Evan Morgan, composed the poem 'Vale' in dedication to Rodakowski.

NotesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Rodakowski, Raymond Juzio Paul, charterhousewarmemorial.org.uk. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  2. Racing worldwide 1919-1949, p. 209, teamdan.com. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  3. Lindop, Grevel (2003), Graves and the Goddess: Essays on Robert Graves's The White Goddess, p. 78.
  4. The London Gazette (29000), p. 10452, thegazette.co.uk. 8 December 1914. Retrieved 28 October 2016.
  5. Kipling, Rudyard, The Irish Guards in the Great War: The First & The Second Battalion.
  6. The London Gazette (30086), p. 5024, thegazette.co.uk. 22 May 1917. Retrieved 28 October 2016.

ReferencesEdit

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